The D'Esposito Lab is a cognitive neuroscience research laboratory within the
Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute
and the Department of Psychology.

Recent Publications

Adnan, A, Chen AJW, Novakovic-Agopian T, D'Esposito M, Turner GR.  2017.  Brain Changes Following Executive Control Training in Older Adults., 2017 Sep 01. Neurorehabilitation and neural repair. :1545968317728580. Abstract

While older adults are able to attend to goal-relevant information, the capacity to ignore irrelevant or distracting information declines with advancing age. This decline in selective attention has been associated with poor modulation of brain activity in sensory cortices by anterior brain regions implicated in cognitive control.

Nee, DE, D'Esposito M.  2017.  Causal evidence for lateral prefrontal cortex dynamics supporting cognitive control., 2017 Sep 13. eLife. 6 Abstract

The lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) is essential for higher-level cognition, but how its interactions support cognitive control remains elusive. Previously (Nee and D'Esposito, 2016), dynamic causal modeling (DCM) indicated that mid LPFC integrates abstract, rostral and concrete, caudal influences to inform context-appropriate action. Here, we use continuous theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) to causally test this model. cTBS was applied to three LPFC sites and a control site in counterbalanced sessions. Behavioral modulations resulting from cTBS were largely predicted by information flow within the previously estimated DCM. However, cTBS to caudal LPFC unexpectedly impaired processes presumed to involve rostral LPFC. Adding a pathway from caudal to mid-rostral LPFC significantly improved the model fit and accounted for the observed behavioral findings. These data provide causal evidence for LPFC dynamics supporting cognitive control and demonstrate the utility of combining DCM with causal manipulations to test and refine models of cognition.

Blumenfeld, RS, Bliss DP, D'Esposito M.  2017.  Quantitative Anatomical Evidence for a Dorsoventral and Rostrocaudal Segregation within the Nonhuman Primate Frontal Cortex., 2017 Oct 24. Journal of cognitive neuroscience. :1-12. Abstract

The intrinsic white matter connections of the frontal cortex are highly complex, and the organization of these connections is not fully understood. Quantitative graph-theoretical methods, which are not solely reliant on human observation and interpretation, can be powerful tools for describing the organizing network principles of frontal cortex. Here, we examined the network structure of frontal cortical subregions by applying graph-theoretical community detection analyses to a graph of frontal cortex compiled from over 400+ macaque white-matter tracing studies. We find evidence that the lateral frontal cortex can be partitioned into distinct modules roughly organized along the dorsoventral and rostrocaudal axis.

Hwang, K, Bertolero M, Liu W, D'Esposito M.  2017.  The human thalamus is an integrative hub for functional brain networks., 2017 Apr 27. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience. Abstract

The thalamus is globally connected with distributed cortical regions, yet the functional significance of this extensive thalamocortical connectivity remains largely unknown. By performing graph-theoretic analyses on thalamocortical functional connectivity data collected from human participants, we found that most thalamic subdivisions display network properties capable of integrating multimodal information across diverse cortical functional networks. From a meta-analysis of a large dataset of functional brain imaging experiments, we further found that the thalamus is involved in multiple cognitive functions. Finally, we found that focal thalamic lesions in humans have widespread distal effects, disrupting the modular organization of cortical functional networks. This converging evidence suggests that the human thalamus is a critical hub region that could integrate diverse information being processed throughout the cerebral cortex, as well as maintain the modular structure of cortical functional networks.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThe thalamus is traditionally viewed as a passive relay station of information from sensory organs or subcortical structures to the cortex. However, the thalamus has extensive connections with the entire cerebral cortex, which can also serve to integrate information processing between cortical regions. In this study, we demonstrate that multiple thalamic subdivisions displays network properties capable of integrating information across multiple functional brain networks. Moreover, the thalamus is engaged by tasks requiring multiple cognitive functions. These findings support the idea that the thalamus is involved in integrating information across cortical networks.

Berry, AS, Shah VD, Furman DJ, White RL, Baker SL, O'Neil JP, Janabi M, D'Esposito M, Jagust WJ.  2017.  Dopamine Synthesis Capacity is Associated with D2/3 Receptor Binding but not Dopamine Release., 2017 Aug 17. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Abstract

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging allows the estimation of multiple aspects of dopamine function including dopamine synthesis capacity, dopamine release, and D2/3 receptor binding. Though dopaminergic dysregulation characterizes a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and addiction, there has been relatively little investigation into the nature of relationships across dopamine markers within healthy individuals. Here we used PET imaging in 40 healthy adults to compare, within individuals, estimates of dopamine synthesis capacity (Ki) using 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine ([(18)F]FMT; a substrate for aromatic amino acid decarboxylase), baseline D2/3 receptor binding potential using [(11)C]raclopride (a weak competitive D2/3 receptor antagonist), and dopamine release using [(11)C]raclopride paired with oral methylphenidate administration. Methylphenidate increases synaptic dopamine by blocking the dopamine transporter. We estimated dopamine release by contrasting baseline D2/3 receptor binding and D2/3 receptor binding following methylphenidate. Analysis of relationships among the three measurements within striatal regions of interest revealed a positive correlation between [(18)F]FMT Ki and the baseline (placebo) [(11)C]raclopride measure, such that participants with greater synthesis capacity showed higher D2/3 receptor binding potential. In contrast, there was no relationship between [(18)F]FMT and methylphenidate-induced [(11)C]raclopride displacement. These findings shed light on the nature of regulation between pre- and postsynaptic dopamine function in healthy adults, which may serve as a template from which to identify and describe alteration with disease.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 17 August 2017. doi:10.1038/npp.2017.180.